THE STRESS RELIEF CENTER

Subtitle

HIDDEN SOURCES OF MSG
 
                            June 1, 1995
                                 
  Food label descriptors that contain enough MSG to serve as common MSG-reaction triggers

                                 
 

    
These ALWAYS contain MSG:

Glutamate                                  
Monosodium glutamate         
Monopotassium glutamate       
Glutamic acid                
Calcium caseinate            
Sodium caseinate             
Gelatin                      
Textured protein
Hydrolyzed protein (any protein that is hydrolyzed)
Yeast extract
Yeast food
Autolyzed yeast
Yeast nutrient
 
 
 
 
     These OFTEN contain MSG or create MSG during processing

Malt extract                                                                         
      Natural  flavor(S) & flavoring(S)
Malt flavoring 
Barley malt                  
Bouillon / 
Broth                                                                              
Carrageenan                  
Maltodextrin                                  
Whey protein isolate         
Whey protein concentrate     
Pectin                       
Anything Protein fortified
Anything Enzyme modified
Flavors(S)  &   Flavoring(S)
Natural pork flavoring
Natural beef flavoring
Stock 
Natural chicken flavoring
Seasonings (the word "seasonings")
Soy sauce
Soy sauce extract
Whey protein                 
Soy protein
Soy protein isolate
Soy protein concentrate
 
 


    
These can be used to CREATE MSG:
 

Protease enzymes   
Protease  
Fungal protease  
Enzymes
 
 
 


Hidden MSG is not limited to use in food.  MSG sensitive people  have
Reported  reactions  to  soaps,  shampoos,  hair  conditioners,   and
Cosmetics  that contain hidden MSG.  The most obvious  common  hiding
Places  are  in  ingredients called "hydrolyzed protein"  and  "amino
Acids."

Drinks,  candy, and chewing gum are also potential sources of  hidden
MSG.  Also, aspartic acid, found in aspartame (NutraSweet) ordinarily
Causes  MSG  type  reactions in MSG sensitive people.   Aspartame  is
Found in some medications.  Check with your pharmacist.

Binders and fillers for medications, nutrients, and supplements, both
Prescription   and   non-prescription,  including   enteral   feeding
Materials  and  some fluids administered intravenously in  hospitals,
May contain MSG.

Reactions  to MSG are dose related, I.e., some people react  to  even
Very  small  amounts  of  MSG  while others  usually  only  react  to
Relatively  more.  MSG-induced reactions may occur immediately  after
Contact or after as much as 48 hours.

There  are  additional ingredients that appear to cause MSG reactions
In   ACUTELY  sensitive  people.   A  list  is  available  for  those
Interested.

  Truth in Labeling Campaign (TLC)  PO Box 2532  Darien, IL  60561

DANGER! MSG NOT JUST A TASTE ENHANCER




By George E. Shambaugh, Jr., MD, Professor Emeritus of Otolaryngology, Northwestern University Medical School, graduate of Harvard University Medical School, author of three editions of Surgery of the Ear, as well as approximately 400 articles and editorials in medical journals

In Japan in 1908 a chemist trained in Germany was looking for the substance in Kombu seaweed that enhances the taste of food and discovered MSG (monosodium glutamate). By 1933 Japanese cooks were using over 10 million pounds of it to make bland recipes taste better. In 1948 quartermasters in the American army met with the foremost food manufacturers in the United States to discuss the Japanese technique for improving the taste of almost any food, and MSG use in America increased rapidly. Today it is added to most soups, chips, fast and frozen foods, prepared packaged dinners, and canned foods. However, since the public has learned about the syndrome of undesirable symptoms produced by MSG, food manufacturers often disguise it as "vegetable protein," "natural flavoring," or "spices," each containing12 to 40 percent MSG. Other commonly used taste enhancers are aspartame (NutraSweet®), cysteine, and aspartic acid. All of them enhance the taste of foods and beverages to which they are added by exciting the taste cells on the tongue.


. . . Taste cells on the tongue are not the only things that these taste enhancers stimulate. When neurons in the brain are exposed to these substances, they become very excited and fire their impulses rapidly until they reach a state of extreme exhaustion. Several hours later these neurons suddenly die, as if the cells were excited to death.


There is increasing scientific evidence, however, that taste cells on the tongue are not the only things that these taste enhancers stimulate. When neurons in the brain are exposed to these substances, they become very excited and fire their impulses rapidly until they reach a state of extreme exhaustion. Several hours later these neurons suddenly die, as if the cells were excited to death. As a result, neuroscientists have dubbed this class of chemicals "excitotoxins."

Dr. Russell Blaylock, a neurosurgeon, has compiled some of the vital research linking excitotoxins to injury and diseases of the nervous system. "Unfortunately," says Blaylock, "most of the information has been buried in technical and scientific journals, far from the public eye." His book, Excitotoxins: The Taste That Kills, 2 published in 1994, cites 430 such articles.


The committee was sufficiently impressed to persuade baby food manufacturers to remove MSG from their products in 1969. But no one warned pregnant mothers to avoid MSG in their own food.


Dr. Blaylock relates how two ophthalmologists in 1957 fed MSG to baby mice and found that the nerve cells of the retina were destroyed by this taste Enhancer. Ten years later another neuroscientist at Washington University, Dr. John W. Olney, repeated the experiment of giving MSG to baby mice. He found that not only were the retinal neurocells destroyed, but brain cells in the hypothalamus were also destroyed after a single dose of MSG. Dr. Olney, knowing that MSG was being added to baby food, informed the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of his findings, but failed to obtain any interest or action. He and others then went directly to Congress, testifying before a Congressional committee. The committee was sufficiently impressed to persuade baby food manufacturers to remove MSG from their products in 1969. But no one warned pregnant mothers to avoid MSG in their own food.


. . . Overstimulation, as well as understimulation, can be devastating on brain development.


Continuing his research, Dr. Olney demonstrated in 1974 that when MSG was fed to pregnant Rhesus monkeys it could cause brain damage to their offspring. Other researchers found similar results when pregnant rats were fed MSG. Yet the FDA remained silent, and gynecologists and pediatricians were not told to warn their patients of this danger. Critics of Olney’s research claim that humans rarely ingest the high doses of MSG given to baby mice and pregnant monkeys. On the contrary, in humans those excitotoxins are concentrated five times more than in experimental animals. The child’s brain is four times more sensitive to any toxins than is an adult’s.

The human brain, when fully developed, contains one hundred billion neurons, with trillions of fiber connections between them. The development of these connections between neurons requires stimulation of the body by touch, speech, and vision. (Unstimulated babies left undisturbed in their cribs are delayed in their ability to sit up and to walk.) But overstimulation, as well as understimulation, can be devastating on brain development.


This "food protection committee" ignored Dr. Olney’s research and believed the biased reports of the food industry.  Dr. Olney concluded that the FDA, supposedly protecting the public, is clearly dominated by powerful and well-heeled industrial giants.


Since we cannot experiment on human children, we must rely upon animal experimentation to learn the effects of substances that are potential health hazards. Baby mice fed MSG, for instance, grow up to be short and grossly obese despite dietary intake in normal amounts for mice. (Today obesity is a growing health problem. Could this be related to the heavy consumption of the so-called "diet sodas" containing NutraSweet®, which actually promote obesity due to the effects of the excitotoxin?)

We know that the hypothalamus is very immature at birth. The damage to this structure of the brain by MSG leads to severe endocrine problems later in life, among them decreased thyroid hormone, increased tendency toward diabetes, and higher cortisone levels than normal. A question that will be raised is: Are children receiving enough excitotoxins to damage their hypothalamus? They may be. A child consuming a soup containing MSG plus a drink with NutraSweet® will have a blood level of excitotoxins six times the blood level that destroys hypothalamus neurons in baby mice. The younger the child, the greater the danger to the brain.


Today obesity is a growing health problem. Could this be related to the heavy consumption of the so-called "diet sodas" containing NutraSweet®, which actually promote obesity due to the effects of the excitotoxin?


There are researchers who report that MSG has no adverse effect on hypothalamic function. Dr. C. B. Neineroff, a primary researcher in this field, attempted to get samples of animals purported to show no neural damage from MSG. Every time, he was denied such requests. (Why?)

While small children are more vulnerable to the effects of excitotoxins, there is increasing evidence that those adults who are especially sensitive to them suffer a slow destruction of brain cells. Previous traumas to the brain, as from a fractured skull, brain concussion, or previous illnesses affecting the brain (such as an attack of encephalitis or exposure to chemical toxins that affect the brain), increase vulnerability to degeneration from excitotoxins. The elderly, whose tissues have suffered the wear and tear of previous illnesses and physical trauma over the years, are especially vulnerable to excitotoxin damage. While there is little evidence that food-borne excitotoxins are the only cause of Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, Huntington’s disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, Lou Gehrig’s disease), there is evidence that in excess they can aggravate these conditions, and may even precipitate them in sensitive individuals.


A child consuming a soup containing MSG plus a drink with NutraSweet® will have a blood level of excitotoxins six times the blood level that destroys hypothalamus neurons in baby mice. The younger the child, the greater the danger to the brain.


In human children and adults not all neurons are affected equally by excitotoxins, for if they were, the child or adult would soon die. Instead, the delayed loss of a neuron here and a neuron there may occur over a considerable period of months or years before there begins to be impairment of function. Other toxic substances in addition to excitotoxins accelerate the death of individual neurons. Mercury, lead, aluminum, and cadmium are pollutants to which all of us are exposed in varying concentrations and over many years. An example is lead poisoning in children, which causes sufficient damage to brain neurons to permanently impair the child’s learning ability. Excitotoxins in beverages and foods will increase the damage to the brain of lead-poisoned children.

The mode of action of excitotoxins on an individual neuron has been shown to weaken the membrane that surrounds each living cell. While exciting the neurons to fire repeatedly, the excitotoxin allows calcium to enter the cell through its membrane. This causes the production of free oxygen radicals, which are believed to be the central cause for every injury and disease, including arthritis and cancer. Fortunately, the normal healthy body possesses antioxidants to quench free radicals before they cause serious damage. Vitamin C in water, and vitamin E and co-enzyme Q10 in fat, help to quench free radicals. In addition, the healthy and adequately nourished body produces three enzymes that trap and neutralize free radicals: superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase. These enzymes require magnesium, chromium, zinc, copper, and selenium. All of these essential nutrients are marginally deficient in today’s American diet of processed foods, so they need to be supplied as supplements.


Excitotoxins in beverages and foods will increase the damage to the brain of lead-poisoned children.


If, indeed, excitotoxins such as MSG (disguised as "vegetable protein," "natural flavoring," or "spices") and aspartame (NutraSweet®) cysteine and aspartic acid may be damaging the brains of children and adults, why is the public not being informed? Dr. Olney found when he published his research in 1969 on how MSG and similar substances could damage the brains of children that there was a firestorm of criticism, with a multitude of papers claiming that experiments in other labs found no toxicity for MSG. Olney found that nearly all such studies were affiliated with and paid for by the food industry. When he testified before a government sponsored "food protection committee," a spokesman from the food industry testified that "even if MSG destroys the arcuate nucleus in the hypothalamus, this doesn’t matter because it was not known to have any significance." Yet, it was already well known then that the arcuate nucleus regulates the release of essential hormones by the pituitary! This "food protection committee" ignored Dr. Olney’s research and believed the biased reports of the food industry. Dr. Olney concluded that the FDA, supposedly protecting the public, is clearly dominated by powerful and well-heeled industrial giants.


The elderly, whose tissues have suffered the wear and tear of previous illnesses and physical trauma over the years, are especially vulnerable to excitotoxin damage. While there is little evidence that food-borne excitotoxins are the only cause of Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, Huntington’s disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, Lou Gehrig’s disease), there is evidence that in excess they can aggravate these conditions, and may even precipitate them in sensitive individuals.


Alzheimer’s disease does appear to be increasing beyond the normal rate of aging. The evidence that Alzheimer’s deterioration is associated with high levels of excitotoxins in the brain, and that there is a strong family history of this disease, indicates that those having had a stroke, high blood pressure, or brain trauma should restrict or totally avoid foods containing MSG, aspartame, and similar substances.

Since free oxygen radicals play a major role in the ultimate brain damage, my advice is to take adequate vitamin C (four to six grams a day in divided doses), vitamin E, (400 to 800 International Units), and beta carotene, 60 milligrams a day in divided doses. The minerals zinc, selenium, and magnesium, deficient in the usual American diet, need to be supplemented: zinc picolinate, containing 20 milligrams of elemental zinc, twice daily; copper sulphate, with 5 milligrams of elemental copper, once daily; selenium, 200 micrograms twice daily; and magnesium, 500 milligrams twice daily to assist the body to produce superoxidase dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase.


. . . the excitoxin . . . causes the production of free oxygen radicals, which are believed to be the central cause for every injury and disease, including arthritis and cancer. Fortunately, the normal healthy body possesses antioxidants to quench free radicals before they cause serious damage. Vitamin C in water, and vitamin E and co-enzyme Q10 in fat, help to quench free radicals. In addition, the healthy and adequately nourished body produces three enzymes that trap and neutralize free radicals: . . .


To strengthen the immune system, take cold-pressed flaxseed or linseed oil, one or two tablespoons daily, and a diet with plenty of complex carbohydrates, plus avoidance of refined sugar to reduce hypoglycemic episodes. Regular exercise by walking one to three miles daily will help to normalize blood-sugar levels. Avoid drinking more than two cups of coffee daily.

Incidentally, just as Excitotoxins was going to press it was learned by Dr. Blaylock that excitotoxins are being added to cigarettes to enhance their taste. "The Taste That Kills," indeed!

___________

1This article was first published in the Summer1995 Shambaugh Medical Research Institute Newsletter #45. Dr. Shambaugh has kindly given us his permission to publish it again in NOHA NEWS.

2Excitotoxins: The Taste That Kills by Russell L. Blaylock, MD, copyright 1994, Health Press, Box 1388, Santa Fe, New Mexico, 87504, 264 pages, hard back, $27.00.

Article from NOHA NEWS, Vol. XXI, No. 3, Summer 1996, pages 2-4.




Collected Reports of Adverse Reactions to MSG

 
January 1, 1995
                               
Ingestion  of  monosodium glutamate (MSG) is known to  produce  a
Variety of adverse reactions in certain people.  These reactions,
Although  seemingly  dissimilar, are no  more  diverse  than  the
Reactions  found  as side effects of certain neurological  drugs.
We do not know why some people experience reactions and others do
Not. We do not know whether MSG "causes" the condition underlying
The  reaction,  or  whether the underlying  condition  is  simply
Aggravated  by  the  ingestion of MSG.  We  only  know  that  the
Reactions  listed  below are sometimes caused or  exacerbated  by
Ingestion of MSG.

All  forms  of MSG (free glutamic acid that occur in  food  as  a
Consequence  of  manufacture)  cause  these  reactions  in   MSG-
Sensitive  people.  Names of offending ingredients used  to  hide
MSG   in   products  include:  MSG,  glutamic  acid,   glutamate,
Hydrolyzed  protein,  sodium caseinate,  autolyzed  yeast,  yeast
Nutrient,  yeast  food, natural flavoring, and a  host  of  other
Ingredients.   In  addition, the MSG  produced  when  a  protease
Enzyme  or  other  reactive  agent is allowed  to  interact  with
Protein  during  product  manufacture can  bring  on  these  same
Adverse reactions in MSG sensitive persons; and there is often no
Clue  on  the  product label that such an interaction  is  taking
Place.

Cardiac 
  Arrhythmias
  Numbness or paralysis
  Seizures
  Extreme drop in blood pressure
  Slurred speech                         
  Rapid heartbeat (tachycardia)
  Angina

Circulatory
  Swelling

Muscular
  Flu-like achiness
  Joint pain
  Stiffness

Neurological
  Depression
  Dizziness
  Light-headedness
  Loss of balance
  Disorientation
  Mental confusion
  Anxiety
  Panic attacks
  Hyperactivity
  Behavioral problems in children
  Lethargy
  Sleepiness
  Insomnia
  Migraine headache

Digestive
  Diarrhea
  Nausea/vomiting
  Stomach cramps
  Irritable bowel
  Bloating

Respiratory
  Asthma
  Shortness of breath
  Chest pain
  Tightness
  Runny nose
  Sneezing

Skin
  Hives or rash
  Mouth lesions
  Temporary tightness or partial paralysis
    (numbness or tingling) of the skin
  Flushing
  Extreme dryness of the mouth

Urological
  Swelling of prostate
  Nocturia


Visual
  Blurred vision
  Difficulty focusing


Truth in Labeling Campaign, P. O. Box 2532, Darien, IL 60561
                               

     
The Many Faces of Monosodium Glutamate (MSG)

Facts and Statistics:

 

bullet

MSG and Aspartame have similar chemical structures, both are considered to be "excitotoxins"

bullet

People who react adversely to MSG are susceptible to cross-reaction with aspartame.

bullet

Americans consumed about one million pounds of monosodium glutamate in 1950. Today we consume about 300 times that amount!

bullet

Some researchers claim that only 1-2% of Americans experience adverse reactions to MSG.

bullet

Other studies reveal as many as 25-30% American react to MSG.

bullet

Over 30% of all people are found to be extra sensitive to MSG if consuming over 5 grams of MSG in one sitting.

bullet

90% of the population are "oversensitive" if consuming over 10 grams of MSG.

bullet

Nonsensitive people are able to eat high doses, up to 25 grams, without having adverse reactions. (Putting that into perspective, a pound contains about 454 grams.)

bullet

US FDA defines MSG as "naturally occurring," so has it on the GRAS list (Generally Regarded As Safe)

bullet

MSG's action is to excite the neurotransmitters, causing nerve cells to discharge an electrical impulse, exciting the nerves of the tasting apparatus.

bullet

There is no list of "safe" foods which do not contain MSG because food processors often change recipes.

bullet

Your best bet to avoid MSG is to READ THE LABEL, READ THE LABEL, READ THE LABEL.

 

Who should NOT have MSG?

 

bullet

ADD and ADHD people

bullet

Babies!

bullet

Children

bullet

Depressed people

bullet

Hypoglycemic patients

bullet

People who get migraine headaches

bullet

People with Congestive Heart Failure (CHF)

bullet

People with nervous system diseases

bullet

People with pre-existing vascular disease

bullet

People with renal (kidney) problems

bullet

Pregnant women

 

Note: The homeopathic, "Food Additive Detox Drops" produced by Professional Health Formulations and sold through professionals helps the body get rid of MSG, sulfites, aspartame, and other food additives. I would never be without these drops because it's almost impossible to manipulate my life to avoid those things which I am allergic to and I often get exposed to them-- unfortunately. I personally know of one life these drops have saved.

 

Top Adverse Reactions Associated with MSG:

Listed in order of frequency according to the FDA

 

 

Vomiting

 

Diarrhea

 

Heart Rate Changes/Arrhythmias

 

Stomach Cramps

 

Mood Changes

 

Fatigue

 

Dizziness

 

Other Adverse Reactions to MSG:

 

 

ALS (contributing to)

 

Joint pain

 

Anxiety

 

Learning disabilities

 

Angina

 

Lethargy

 

Arrhythmia

 

Light-headedness

 

Asthma

 

Loss of balance

 

Behavioral probs. In kids

 

Mental confusion

 

BPH (enlarged prostate)

 

Migraine headaches

 

Bloating

 

Mouth lesions

 

Blood pressure incr. Or decr.

 

Nausea

 

Blurred vision

 

Nervousness

 

Chest pain

 

Nocturia (bed wetting)

 

Clouded memory

 

Numbness/tingling skin

 

Concentration challenges

 

Panic attacks

 

Convulsions

 

Pounding heart

 

Depression

 

Runny nose

 

Developmental brain defects

 

Sciatica

 

Diarrhea

 

Shortness of breath

 

Difficulty w/ balance

 

Skin rashes

 

Disorientation

 

Sleep disturbances

 

Dizziness

 

Sleepiness

 

Drowsiness

 

Slurred speech

 

Esophageal Reflux

 

Sneezing

 

Extreme Dry mouth

 

Stiffness

 

Extreme mood swings

 

Stomach ache

 

Flu-like aches

 

Stomach cramps

 

Flushing of the skin

 

Swelling

 

Focusing challenges

 

Swelling of the throat

 

Heartburn

 

Swollen gums

 

Glaucoma in test animals

 

Temporary tightness/partial paralysis

 

Hives or rashes

 

Tightness

 

Hyperactivity

 

Tinnitus

 

Infertility in test animals

 

Vomiting

 

Insomnia

 

Weakness

 

Irritable bowel

   

 

Syndromes Associated with MSG:

 

"Chinese Restaurant Syndrome": The syndrome occurring 15 to 20 minutes after ingesting Chinese restaurant food containing MSG believed to be responsible for racing heart or palpitations, chest pain, general weakness, headache, and numbness at the back of the neck radiating down the arms and back, facial pressure, anxiety, eyelid twitching. The syndrome lasts up to several hours and sometimes leaves one with a hangover effect.

 

MSG symptom complex is thought to be responsible for poorly controlled asthma and asthmatic symptoms following ingestion of MSG.

 

Migraine Headaches: MSG seems to be a common cause of migraines. I have muscle-tested that the headaches can happen up to 36 hours after ingesting MSG. For those people ingesting MSG every day in something, it's kind of hard to track down the core cause of a headache when you are not thinking more than a few hours ahead!

 

Reaction Times and Duration of Symptoms:

 

Reactions and duration of symptoms times vary for all symptoms and can occur immediately upon ingestion and up to up to 48 hours after ingestion of MSG. While MSG reactions vary widely from one individual to another, the reactions are markedly consistent for each individual.

 

For example: If your particular reaction to eating MSG is a dangerously racing heartbeat and flushing skin these symptoms will consistently be your reaction each time you consume MSG.

 

For me, I start to feel a heart arrhythmia (palpitations), mild asthma, anxiety, nervousness, my feet start to swell, my eyelids twitch and slight nausea--every time the MSG load gets to be too much in my body. If I'm lucky, I have my Food Additive Detox Drops with me, and yes, I have an extra bottle backed in my luggage! (Along with the food I pack around every time I travel.)

 

Question: I eat foods with naturally occurring MSG (glutamic acid). How come I don't react to that?

 

As the theory goes, most proteins, such as meat and other types of natural food products, are quite rich in glutamic acid in the form of protein. This is slowly broken down with digestion so you're delivering the amount in slower and smaller quantities than if you were eating food highly seasoned with MSG.

 

When you ingest MSG in it's free form, glutamic acid, it doesn't have to be broken off of a protein chain so it can absorb more quickly and in higher doses. When this happens, the body just can't keep up and the liver gets overloaded.

 

A quick test to see how your liver is doing in the detoxification arena: Look at the tips of your fingernails. Do you see reddish lines just at the tips? If so, your liver is overloaded. You will need to find out why, cut some MSG foods out of your system, eat more raw fruits and vegetables and possibly add a liver cleanser of some kind to your regime.

 

SOURCES OF MSG:

 

Monosodium Glutamate is Naturally Occurring in:

 

Apples

 

Potatoes

 

Dairy Products

 

Poultry

 

Eggs

 

Sea Tangles

 

Fish

 

Seaweed

 

Grapefruit

 

Soybeans

 

Meat

 

Sugar Beets (white sugar like U and I)

 

Mushrooms

 

Tomatoes

 

Oranges

   

 

Names on Food Labels that Always Contain Some MSG and the names of ingredients sometimes (but not always) used to hide MSG:

 

Note: Products labeled "no MSG added" are not necessarily free of MSG.

 

 

Accent

 

Pectin

 

Ajinomoto(in Oriental food)

 

Protease

 

Calcium caseinate

 

Protease enzymes

 

Gelatin

 

Seasonings

 

Glutamate

 

Sodium caseinate

 

Glutamic Acid

 

Soy protein concentrate

 

Glutavene

 

Soy protein isolate

 

Hydrolyzed Oat Flour

 

Soy Sauce

 

Hydrolyzed Protein

 

Soy sauce extract

 

Malt Flavoring

 

Stock

 

Malt-extract

 

Textured protein

 

Maltodextrin

 

Whey protein

 

Mono potassium glutamate

 

Whey protein concentrate

 

Monosodium glutamate

 

Whey protein isolate

 

Natural beef flavoring

 

Yeast extract

 

Natural chicken flavoring

 

Yeast food

 

Natural flavoring

 

Yeast nutrient

 

Natural pork flavoring

 

Zest

 

Food Label Names That Often Contain MSG, or Create MSG During Processing:

 

 

Ajinomoto

 

Malt flavoring

 

Anything labeled fermented

 

Maltodextrin

 

Asian food condiments

 

Manufactured foods

 

Autolyzed yeast

 

Mayonnaise

 

Barley malt

 

Mei-Jing

 

Bouillon

 

Milk solids in low-fat prods.

 

Broth and Stock

 

Mustard

 

Cake

 

Natural beef flavoring

 

Candy

 

Natural chicken flavoring

 

Canned chili

 

Natural flavoring

 

Canned gravies

 

Natural pork flavoring

 

Canned stew

 

Pectin

 

Canned sauces

 

Pickles (a fermented prod.)

 

Carrageenan

 

Processed foods

 

Catsup

 

Protease

 

Chewing gum

 

Protease enzymes

 

Convenience foods

 

Protein

 

Deli-style meats

 

Protein concentrate

 

"Diet" foods

 

Protein fortified

 

Enzymes

 

Protein isolate

 

Enzyme fortified

 

Restaurant food (most fast)

 

Fermented foods

 

Sauce Extract

 

Flavor packets in:

 

Seasoning (the word)

 

     Boxed rice

 

Smoked meats

 

     Dried soups

 

Soy protein concentrate

 

 

     Pasta mixes

 

Soy protein isolate

 

     Salad dressing mixes

 

Soy Sauce

 

     Top Ramen

 

Spices (sometimes is MSG)

 

"Flavorings"

 

Stock

 

Fortified flavoring

 

Subu

 

Frozen foods

 

Tamari

 

Kombu Extract

 

Wei-Jing

 

Hydrolyzed cosmetics

 

Whey protein

 

Ice Cream

 

Whey protein isolate

 

Malt extract

 

Whey protein concentrate

     

Worcestershire sauce

 

Note: Sodium guanylate and Disodium inosinate are two expensive flavor enhancing chemical food additives that most always are associated with MSG because MSG is cheap and used to extend the food additives.

 

Some Hidden Sources of MSG:

 

Auxigro WP Plant Metabolic Primer contains around 30% MSG and is meant to be sprayed on beans, lettuce, peanuts, tomatoes and potatoes. (Is this REALLY necessary?)

 

 

Baby food (Glutamic Acid)

 

Flu-Mist flu vaccine

 

       Carnation Good Start

 

Frozen TV dinner entrees

 

       Enfalac Iron Fortified

 

Gatorade

 

       Enfalac

 

Hair conditioner w/amino acids

 

      Nutramingen Hypoallerg.

 

Ice cream (most)

 

      Isomil Soy Formula

 

Iced teas (some)

 

      Similac Lactose Free

 

Nutrients

 

Bacon and Ham

 

Pre-formed frozen hambergr

 

Bakery items w/ fruit fillings

 

Processed Cheese

 

Binders/fillers in medication

 

Shampoos

 

Canned gravies

 

Soaps

 

Canned salmon

 

Supplements (fillers in)

 

Canned tuna fish (most)

 

Tobacco

 

Cereals

 

Toothpaste w/ carrageenan

 

Chewing gum

 

Wax on fruits

 

Chicken/Turkey gravy mix

 

Whipped cream

 

Cosmetics w/ "amino acids"

 

Yeast (Red Star brand)

 

Cottage cheese

 

              it's grown on beets

 

Enteric feeding materials

 

Yogurt

 

Depressing, isn't it? No wonder I do so well on the Zone and Blood Type diet. I have to prepare my own food and eat simply. I'm eliminating most of the things on these lists! Kind of boring, but I sure do feel a lot better.

 

History of MSG

 

Japanese cooks have traditionally used pieces of Kombu, a seaweed, to flavor broth and stews. In 1908 a Japanese scientist, named Kikunae Ikeda, became curious about why his wife used Kombu to season the family's soup. Taking his curiosity to the laboratory, Ikeda isolated the flavor-enhancing component of kombu and identified it as the sodium salt of glutamic acid, or monosodium glutamate (MSG).

 

Kikunae Ikeda, thinking ahead, took out a patent on the manufacturing of this white powder flavor enhancer that he'd isolated, as well as subsequent patents on commercial manufacturing processes to use it.

 

By 1933, monosodium glutamate had become an important, even  predominant, ingredient in flavoring oriental food. It wasn't until World War II that the United States became intrigued by this potent flavor enhancing powder as a way to enhance the flavor of army field rations.

 

In 1948, the Armed Forces Chief Quartermaster convened an eight-hour symposium that was attended by all the major American food manufacturers and sellers. The topic of this historical one-day meeting was "Marvelous Uses for the New Flavor Enhancer, Monosodium Glutamate."

 

Leading food industry representatives returned from the 1948 meeting, excited about what they'd learned about how MSG could increase the flavor and palatability of their commercial food products. Moreover, not only does MSG increase flavor and aroma, but it also suppresses undesirable "off" flavors. It could make marginal food taste better, and could even eliminate the "tinny" taste of canned foods.

 

This "discovery" coincided perfectly with the rise of fast and commercially prepared food products in this country. Competing fast food companies eagerly took advantage of this new flavor enhancing powder.... Until, today MSG, in all its guises, is difficult to avoid. The effects of those historical eight hours can still be witnessed on supermarket labels today as you can see by the many names and forms MSG is now known as.

 

Not only does MSG provide "mouth satisfaction" and "total intensity of food", but some believe that MSG may even provide a fifth basic taste sensation (in addition to sweet, sour, salty, and bitter), what the Japanese call "umami", roughly translated as "tastiness."

 

Your best bet on avoiding MSG?

 

bullet

The safest produce is organic produce.

bullet

It is best to make things from scratch, avoiding all processed foods.

bullet

Avoid making stews or soups, or using a crock pot. (Slow cooking for a long time may cause small amounts of glutamic acid to be released from the protein in the food being slowly cooked.)

bullet

Be aware that some shrimp and other shell fish may have been dipped in Trisodium phosphate (TSP), a cleaning product that can cause reactions similar to MSG in MSG sensitive people. (Farm raised shrimp are usually all right to eat).

bullet

Trisodium phosphate may also be found in chicken parts  on major brands such as Prod and Tyson.

 

           Some Best-Bet Foods:

 

bullet

Kashi seven puffed grains plus sesame seed (white box with purple trim)

bullet

Barbara's or Nabisco shredded wheat

bullet

Oatmeal, unflavored

bullet

Cream of wheat

     

 

Recent Videos

2207 views - 0 comments
2499 views - 0 comments
2802 views - 0 comments
2672 views - 0 comments